Faculty Blog, Haynes

It’s Time to Pay Attention

For the past two years, our government has been steadily eroding the rule of law, chilling speech, riding rough shod over state’s rights, engaging in retaliatory activity against activists, and violating the constitution.  You may not have paid attention, because much of this activity has been centered in the field of immigration law.  If you… Continue reading It’s Time to Pay Attention

Faculty Blog, Professor Manus

The Assault on Affirmative Action in Education

Among the polarizing initiatives of the Trump administration are its policies on education. Whether addressing sexual assault on campuses, funding for the Special Olympics, or the prospect of training teachers in the use of deadly weapons, the Department of Education (DEd) has stunned policy-watchers in its willingness to promote or support regressive changes to the… Continue reading The Assault on Affirmative Action in Education

Faculty Blog, Friedman

Iran, Al Qaeda and the Legacy of September 11

The Trump administration may well be contemplating military action against Iran. Not only has it named Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard a foreign terrorist group – the first such designation under the aegis of a nation-state – but Secretary of State Mike Pompeo suggested in recent Senate testimony that he has “no doubt there is a… Continue reading Iran, Al Qaeda and the Legacy of September 11

Faculty Blog, Singer

Reckless Tweeters Could Learn From Jury Duty

Reality is a complicated thing, but don’t tell that to the politicians and pundits on Twitter. Consider statements made within hours of the alleged attack on actor Jussie Smollett on January 29. U.S. Senators Cory Booker and Kamala Harris both characterized the incident as “an attempted modern-day lynching,” and several Hollywood actors quickly blamed the… Continue reading Reckless Tweeters Could Learn From Jury Duty

Faculty Blog, Friedman, Hansen

Keeping the President in Check, One Congressional Hearing at a Time

The State of the Union address is not just an annual ritual—it is a requirement. Article II, Section 3 of the Constitution provides that the President “shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union.” That the speech is, today, more rhetorical than informative does not mean it… Continue reading Keeping the President in Check, One Congressional Hearing at a Time

Faculty Blog, Singer

Why the Gabbard-Hirono feud matters for the federal courts

There has been much press in the past week over U.S. Representative Tulsi Gabbard's op-ed in The Hill, which criticized fellow Democrats for having "weaponized religion for their own selfish gain." Gabbard called out members of the Senate Judiciary Committee for specific questions and statements they had directed to Catholic judicial nominees over the past… Continue reading Why the Gabbard-Hirono feud matters for the federal courts

Faculty Blog, Friedman, Hansen

Checking Trump, One Foreign Policy at a Time

We wrote recently, in Just Security, about December’s bipartisan Senate vote and resolution to withdraw U.S. military assistance from Yemen and to assign responsibility for the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman—legislative moves contrary to the policy wishes of the Trump administration. The Senate’s actions suggested three developments in… Continue reading Checking Trump, One Foreign Policy at a Time

Faculty Blog, Friedman, Privacy

On the Moral Duty to Leave Facebook

In an essay published last November, the philosopher S. Matthew Liao asks: do we have a moral duty to leave Facebook? His answer: not yet. In light of Facebook’s destructive effect on information privacy, I’m not sure the answer to his question shouldn’t be an unequivocal “yes.” Considering the duties one owes to others, Liao… Continue reading On the Moral Duty to Leave Facebook

Faculty Blog, Friedman

The Supreme Court Declines to Resolve Yet Another Lower Court Conflict  

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is unhappy again – not with a substantive ruling by the court, but with a decision by the majority to decline to hear a particular case. Last year, Thomas, joined by Justice Samuel Alito, dissented from a decision by the majority – one in a long line – not to… Continue reading The Supreme Court Declines to Resolve Yet Another Lower Court Conflict  

Faculty Blog, Professor Manus

The Latest Decision in the Keystone XL Saga: The State Department Fails to Explain an Environmental Reversal

This is a story that begins and ends with global warming. That global warming is happening and that human activities contribute to it is the overwhelming consensus of the science community, decades-deep in studies and expertise. That is a fact. I've heard and considered the proposition that all the scientists could be wrong -- doggedly… Continue reading The Latest Decision in the Keystone XL Saga: The State Department Fails to Explain an Environmental Reversal