Faculty Blog, Singer

Is the Supreme Court Rethinking the Federal Courts’ Mission?

For some time, the Supreme Court and Congress have jointly viewed the federal court system as a special, nearly exclusive forum for resolving disputes. Congress has permitted federal courts to hear only those cases that directly invoke a federal law, or in which the parties are citizens of entirely different states. And the Supreme Court… Continue reading Is the Supreme Court Rethinking the Federal Courts’ Mission?

Faculty Blog, Haynes

Big Brother Is, In Fact, Watching

The US government is tracking people who oppose its unlawful and inhuman practices.  In February of 2019, I filed Communiques with UN Special Rapporteurs, asking for their intervention with the US government.  UN human rights mechanisms are a last resort, utilized when a person’s own government is harming them, and refuses requests for transparency about… Continue reading Big Brother Is, In Fact, Watching

Faculty Blog, Haynes

It’s Time to Pay Attention

For the past two years, our government has been steadily eroding the rule of law, chilling speech, riding rough shod over state’s rights, engaging in retaliatory activity against activists, and violating the constitution.  You may not have paid attention, because much of this activity has been centered in the field of immigration law.  If you… Continue reading It’s Time to Pay Attention

Faculty Blog, Friedman

Iran, Al Qaeda and the Legacy of September 11

The Trump administration may well be contemplating military action against Iran. Not only has it named Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard a foreign terrorist group – the first such designation under the aegis of a nation-state – but Secretary of State Mike Pompeo suggested in recent Senate testimony that he has “no doubt there is a… Continue reading Iran, Al Qaeda and the Legacy of September 11

Faculty Blog, Friedman, Hansen

Checking Trump, One Foreign Policy at a Time

We wrote recently, in Just Security, about December’s bipartisan Senate vote and resolution to withdraw U.S. military assistance from Yemen and to assign responsibility for the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman—legislative moves contrary to the policy wishes of the Trump administration. The Senate’s actions suggested three developments in… Continue reading Checking Trump, One Foreign Policy at a Time

Faculty Blog, Hansen

The Evolution of Military Justice Continues

Those who are interested in national security law and military justice should take note that the most significant changes to the U.S. military justice system in almost 70 years will soon go into effect.  We have not seen change on this scale since the adoption of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) in 1951.… Continue reading The Evolution of Military Justice Continues

Forum Publishing

Open for Submissions – Closing January 2019

The New England Law Review Forum is currently accepting submissions from professional authors until January 2019. The New England Law Review Forum is the online extension of the New England Law Review. The Forum is able to offer quick publishing turn-around because of its online home, and we are thus able to publish on both timely topics and topics that would… Continue reading Open for Submissions – Closing January 2019

Faculty Blog

Faculty Blog: What the Improper Removal of Mueller Could Mean for Trump’s Presidency

President Trump has recently taken to Twitter to disparage Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of possible links between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election. Coupled with the Attorney General’s firing of former deputy director of the FBI Andrew McCabe days before his retirement, the President may be seeking to undermine Mueller’s credibility… Continue reading Faculty Blog: What the Improper Removal of Mueller Could Mean for Trump’s Presidency

Editor Blog

Article Preview: Courts and Informal Constitutional Change in the States

The Constitution is at the heart of our state and individual rights and is the foundation of our very nation.  When considering constitutional law, the Federal Constitution is the document that most frequently comes to mind.  However, each individual state has its own state constitution that governs its residents simultaneously with the Federal Constitution.  As… Continue reading Article Preview: Courts and Informal Constitutional Change in the States

Editor Blog, Uncategorized

Article Preview: Re-Reading Alafair Burke’s The Ex

There can be no doubt that the legal profession is frequently depicted in popular culture. Take a look at the front page of any major newspaper, and you will invariably find stories depicting the latest political development, sensational trial, or other legal phenomena. But in recent decades, law-and-literature, as a discipline, has been described as… Continue reading Article Preview: Re-Reading Alafair Burke’s The Ex