Civil Rights Act, Due Process, Editor Blog, Equal Pay, Gender Discrimination, New England Law Review, Policy, Student Writing, transitional justice, U.S. Supreme Court

Article Preview: Why Is Your Grass Greener than Mine?: The Need for Legal Reform to Combat Gender Discrimination in Professional Sports

Contributing Author: John Kulevich
Sports arose in the primitive era as activities used to train warriors for battle. They continue to this day, though for different purposes: as a form of recreation, as a profession, and as a form of relaxation for spectators watching them. While women who play sports have gradually gained some acceptance in society, they experience gender discrimination and inequality compared to their male counterparts, in the form of lower wages, fewer endorsements, and less media coverage. This is especially true in professional sports. Tanya Dennis, the author of Why Is Your Grass Greener than Mine?: The Need for Legal Reform to Combat Gender Discrimination in Professional Sports, proposes a new statute (the “Professional Sports Act of 2015”), which provides women protection against gender discrimination in professional sports, and explains why the current state of the law is not adequate. For example, Title IX prevents gender discrimination in federally funded educational institutions, and this protection includes prohibition of gender discrimination in school athletics within those educational institutions. As a result of this protection from gender discrimination in school sports, women’s sports have become more popular and received more media attention. Nevertheless, Title IX does not apply to professional sports and therefore cannot protect women from gender discrimination in professional sports.

5th Amendment, criminal law, Criminal Procedure, Due Process, Editor Blog, Fifth Amendment, New England Law Review, Police Interrogation, Policy, Privacy, property, Student Writing, Use of Force

Article Preview: One Step Forward Two Steps Back: The SJC’s Incorrect Decision in Commonwealth v. Gelfgatt Deprives Technology Users of Their Constitutional Rights

Contributing Editor: Cody Zane
The Fifth Amendment of the United States Constitution protects individual criminal defendants against self-incrimination. However, as the world continues to develop at such a rapid pace and technology becomes synonymous with everyday life, Fifth Amendment protections become clouded. In 2014, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (“SJC”), in Commonwealth v. Galfgatt, significantly reduced Fifth Amendments protections by failing to extend these rights to the defendant, who was compelled to produce decryption keys encrypting mortgage schemes. Specifically, the SJC lowered the evidentiary burden of reasonable particularity in its forgone conclusion analysis. Additionally, the SJC failed to apply Article 12 of the Massachusetts constitution in its analysis.

Article Preview, criminal law, Criminal Procedure, Due Process, Editor Blog, Juvenile Law, New England Law Review, Policy, prosecutors, School Reform, Student Writing, transitional justice

Article Preview: The (Unfinished) Growth of the Juvenile Justice System

Contributing Editor: Amy Robinson
The juvenile justice system has made dramatic changes over the past thirty years. In three landmark cases, Roper v. Simmons, Graham v. Florida, and Miller v. Alabama, the Supreme Court recognized that juvenile offenders are different from adult offenders. These cases marked a shift in the way the judiciary understands the cognitive differences between juveniles and adults. However, despite advancements in the system, courts have failed to properly focus on the goal of rehabilitation.

Apprendi, Article Preview, Editor Blog, Sixth Amendment, Student Writing

Article Preview: Money Makes All the Difference: Why Corporate Defendants Are Not Entitled to the Sixth Amendment Jury Trial Right’s Full Protection by Allison Reuter

Contributing Editor: Kevin Mortimer
Personal interests and motivations differ from person to person. The consequences of a criminal conviction are life-altering and may include moral condemnation, retribution, and incarceration. Corporations, on the other hand, typically have one motivation: maximizing profit. Corporations, with their “vast size, wealth, and power,” do not possess a conscience. They will never face the moral condemnation, imprisonment, or death penalty that so many human beings fear. Rather, corporations face criminal fines that are often treated as “a mere cost of business or a slap on the wrist.” These fines do not serve the purpose of moral condemnation or retribution, but rather serve mere regulatory functions.