Article Preview, Behavioral Legal Ethics, Editor Blog, New England Law Review, Symposium

Article Preview: Ain’t Misbehaving: Behavioral Ethics and Rest’s Model of Moral Judgment

Lawyers and law students are taught how to spot ethical issues through analysis of hypothetical situations. When it comes to recognizing our own ethical mistakes, there appears to be a disconnect between the ability to apply that knowledge to theoretical situations and to use it to resolve situations in practice. In their article Behavior Ethics and the Four-Component Model of Moral Judgment and Behavior, authors Milton C. Regan, Jr. and Nancy L. Sachs respond to Associate Dean Catherine Gage O’Grady’s analysis of the “dynamics that can affect new lawyer’s ability to recognize that they have made a mistake and their willingness to acknowledge it to others.” As both O’Grady and the authors point out, these kinds of mistakes can have significant ethical implications if the mistaken attorney cannot or will not acknowledge the impact of her error. In order to assist in the process of acknowledgment and avoid ethical issues, Regan and Sachs propose a framework for guiding these issues to their appropriate conclusion. Regan and Sachs find value in the union of psychology and ethics to guide the thinking of a new lawyer deciding whether to acknowledge her mistake to others and the ethical violations that can arise from that choice.

Article Preview, Behavioral Legal Ethics, Editor Blog, Law School, New England Law Review, Symposium, Uncategorized

Article Preview: Lawyers, Impression Management and the Fear of Failure

Lawyers often struggle to recognize and learn from their mistakes. Associate Dean Catherine Gage O’Grady has made the argument in her Article, A Behavioral Approach to Lawyer Mistake and Apology, that this is a result of cognitive biases, and offered insight about how law firms might respond to facilitate learning, professional growth, and stronger ethics. In his Response Article, Lawyers, Impression Management and the Fear of Failure, Donald C. Langevoort not only supports O’Grady’s position, but also presents additional reasons to pay close attention to the insight provided by Associate Dean O’Grady.

1st Amendment, Contributor Profile, Editor Blog, First Amendment, Free Press, Free Speech, New England Law Review, Policy, Privacy, Sonja West, Symposium, West

Contributing Author Profile: Sonja West

Contributing Editor: Ryan Goodhue
Sonja R. West is an associate professor at the University of Georgia School of Law, which she joined in 2006. She teaches courses on Constitutional Law, Media Law, and the U.S. Supreme Court. Sonja earned a B.A. in journalism and communication studies from the University of Iowa. Prior to attending law school, she worked as a reporter in the Midwest and Washington, D.C. She received her J.D. from the University of Chicago School of Law where she served as executive editor of the school’s Law Review.

1st Amendment, Clay Calvert, Editor Blog, First Amendment, Free Press, Free Speech, New England Law Review, Privacy, publicity rights, Symposium

Contributing Author Profile: Clay Calvert

Contributing Editor: Aysha Warsi
Respected author and professor, Clay Calvert, will be a panelist at the New England Law Review’s Spring Symposium on February 11, 2016. Professor Calvert earned his B.A. in Communication with distinction and Ph.D. in Communication from Stanford University. He also received his J.D. Order of the Coif from the University of the Pacific’s McGeorge School of Law. Professor Calvert is a member of the State Bar of California and the Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States.