Faculty Blog, Singer

Decoding Judge Kavanaugh’s “Open Mind” on Supreme Court Cameras

In one of the more substantive moments of this month’s Supreme Court Confirmation Theater, Judge Brett Kavanaugh was asked whether he would support broadcasting video of the Supreme Court’s oral arguments. Kavanaugh demurred, saying only that he would keep “an open mind” on the issue. Given that most members of the Supreme Court have come… Continue reading Decoding Judge Kavanaugh’s “Open Mind” on Supreme Court Cameras

Faculty Blog

Faculty Blog: What the Improper Removal of Mueller Could Mean for Trump’s Presidency

President Trump has recently taken to Twitter to disparage Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of possible links between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election. Coupled with the Attorney General’s firing of former deputy director of the FBI Andrew McCabe days before his retirement, the President may be seeking to undermine Mueller’s credibility… Continue reading Faculty Blog: What the Improper Removal of Mueller Could Mean for Trump’s Presidency

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Faculty Blog: The Most Important Qualification for a Post in President Trump’s Cabinet

By: Lawrence M. Friedman and David M. Siegel As the confirmation process for President Trump’s cabinet comes to a close, it’s worth noting that Senators have failed to question any of the nominees about their understanding of their constitutional responsibilities under the Twenty-Fifth Amendment, much less whether any would be willing to fulfill those responsibilities.… Continue reading Faculty Blog: The Most Important Qualification for a Post in President Trump’s Cabinet

Article II, Competency, Congress, Constitution, Executive Power, Faculty Blog, Federal Courts, Friedman, Judges, Judicial Elections, Judicial Performance Evaluation, Judicial Review, New England Law Review, Nominations, Policy, President Obama, U.S. Supreme Court

Faculty Blog: The Ninth Justice

At this writing, Senate Republicans continue to refuse even to hold a hearing on President Obama's nominee to succeed the late Associate Justice, Antonin Scalia, on the U.S. Supreme Court. The fullest explanation of their collective decision to ignore the Senate's constitutional role in the judicial appointment process has come from Utah Senator Orrin Hatch who, in a recent New York Times op-ed, spelled out their arguments. In that piece, Senator Hatch attacked President Obama’s judicial appointments for embracing “the sort of judicial activism Justice Scalia spent his career seeking to curtail.” Worse, in Senator Hatch’s view, when Democrats controlled the Senate they were complicit in this effort. Thus, he concludes, voters should decide what kind of Supreme Court they want through the 2016 Presidential election—which can happen only if the Senate delays confirmation proceedings on the President’s nominee, Judge Merrick Garland. He argues that considering a nominee today would be “irresponsible” and, he concludes, not “in the best interests of the Senate, the judiciary and the country.”

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Contributing Author Profile: Steven Gariepy

Contributing Editor: Robin Craig
In today’s ever-changing environment, it is important to understand the interconnectedness of military and civilian life, the role law has in governing the use of military force, and how the U.S. government seeks to reduce civilian casualties in active combat environments. Having been deployed in Afghanistan, Lieutenant Colonel Steven Gariepy draws on his first-hand military experience to confront these issues and how the U.S., and its NATO allies, address the legal and humanitarian complications related with military action. Presenting on topics, including “International Humanitarian Law in Practice” and “Mitigating Civilian Casualties in Afghanistan: The Applicability of International Human Rights Law during Military Operations,” Lieutenant Colonel Gariepy applies practical knowledge and experience to complex, multi-layered issues in a manner his audience can understand.