Carla Spivack, Faculty Blog, Kent Schenkel

The Two-Word Clause that Could Prevent Jeffrey Epstein’s Alleged Victims from Receiving Financial Justice

The will and trust of Jeffrey Epstein, financier and accused sex trafficker, have been making headlines this week. These documents seem to have been a last-ditch – and probably, in the long run, futile – attempt to protect Epstein’s assets from the claims of his accusers. It’s unlikely that he managed to transfer his assets… Continue reading The Two-Word Clause that Could Prevent Jeffrey Epstein’s Alleged Victims from Receiving Financial Justice

Faculty Blog, Friedman, Hansen

A Trial Date Set for September 11 Planners But No Justice in Sight

As reported in the New York Times, the judge overseeing the military tribunal of Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and the four other suspects believed to have designed and organized the September 11 attacks has set a trial date of January 2021. Although there have been numerous court hearings for these five suspects since they arrived at… Continue reading A Trial Date Set for September 11 Planners But No Justice in Sight

Editor Blog, Uncategorized

Article Preview: Kooks, Crooks, Brutes or Rhadamanthine Opacities: Some Thoughts on the Depiction of Judges in Popular Fiction

In fictitious literary and cinematic works, American judges are often portrayed as unethical, corrupt, eccentric, or simply brutal; however, the overwhelming majority of American judges are doing their difficult jobs fairly well. In his Article, Kooks, Crooks, Brutes or Rhadamanthine Opacities: Some Thoughts on the Depiction of Judges in Popular Fiction, U.S. District Judge Michael… Continue reading Article Preview: Kooks, Crooks, Brutes or Rhadamanthine Opacities: Some Thoughts on the Depiction of Judges in Popular Fiction

Faculty Blog, Uncategorized

Faculty Blog: The Most Important Qualification for a Post in President Trump’s Cabinet

By: Lawrence M. Friedman and David M. Siegel As the confirmation process for President Trump’s cabinet comes to a close, it’s worth noting that Senators have failed to question any of the nominees about their understanding of their constitutional responsibilities under the Twenty-Fifth Amendment, much less whether any would be willing to fulfill those responsibilities.… Continue reading Faculty Blog: The Most Important Qualification for a Post in President Trump’s Cabinet

Uncategorized

Contributing Author Profile: Rachel VanLandingham

Contributing Editor: Kathleen Frain Brekka
Rachel VanLandingham – professor, author, and former member of the U.S. Armed Forces – will present her article "Discipline, Justice, and Command in the U.S. Military: Maximizing Strengths and Minimizing Weakness In A Special Society" at the New England Law Review’s Fall Symposium on Thursday, October 8, 2015 at 4:30 p.m. During her presentation, she will discuss the teleology of the military justice system, specifically addressing why non-lawyer commanders make prosecutorial decisions, and highlighting why such a system should be improved by keeping senior commanders as decision-makers while creating a more equal role for military attorneys, as well by adding other transparency and accountability measures. Rachel VanLandingham earned her B.S. in Political Science from the U.S. Air Force Academy, her M.P.M. with a National Security emphasis from the University of Maryland, College Park, her J.D. from the University of Texas, Austin (high honors), and her LL.M from the U.S. Army’s Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School (Commandant’s List).