1st Amendment, Clay Calvert, Editor Blog, First Amendment, Free Press, Free Speech, New England Law Review, Privacy, publicity rights, Symposium

Contributing Author Profile: Clay Calvert

Contributing Editor: Aysha Warsi
Respected author and professor, Clay Calvert, will be a panelist at the New England Law Review’s Spring Symposium on February 11, 2016. Professor Calvert earned his B.A. in Communication with distinction and Ph.D. in Communication from Stanford University. He also received his J.D. Order of the Coif from the University of the Pacific’s McGeorge School of Law. Professor Calvert is a member of the State Bar of California and the Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States.

1st Amendment, Amy Gajda, Editor Blog, First Amendment, Free Press, Free Speech, New England Law Review, Privacy, publicity rights

Contributing Author Profile: Amy Gajda

Contributing Editor: Shannon Boyne
Amy Gajda is currently an Associate Professor of Law at Tulane University Law School and is internationally recognized for her expertise in the areas of information privacy, media law, torts, and higher education law. In 2013 she was awarded the Felix Frankfurter Award for Distinguished Teaching, Tulane University Law School’s highest teaching honor. She has chaired the Association of American Law Schools’ Sections on Mass Communication and Defamation and Privacy. Ms. Gadja also led the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication’s Law and Policy Division.

1st Amendment, First Amendment, Free Speech

NELR Happenings: The First Amendment Bubble: How Privacy and Paparazzi Threaten a Free Press — Spring 2016 Symposium

Join the New England Law Review for our spring book symposium on February 11th at 4:00 p.m. in the Cherry Room at New England Law | Boston. It will showcase Professor Amy Gajda’s book “The First Amendment Bubble: How Privacy and Paparazzi Threaten a Free Press.” Her book explores judicial oversight of journalism news judgment. She will discuss how the expansion of acceptable news content has shifted courts’ focus from the First Amendment to individual privacy—a shift that curtails mainstream journalists’ press freedoms. Both Professor Calvert as well as Professor West will respond. The symposium will feature Professor Amy Gajda, a Visiting Scholar from Tulane University Law School, as our keynote speaker, as well as feedback and commentary from a panel of prominent legal voices, including:

  • Professor Clay Calvert, University of Florida
  • Associate Professor Sonja R. West, University of Georgia Law
Sponsored By: New England First Amendment Coalition For more information, visit our symposium page here. You can also let us know you are going on our Facebook event page. We look forward to seeing you there!

New England Regional Junior Faculty Workshop

Faculty Blog: Conference Announcement: New England Regional Junior Faculty Scholarship Workshop

New England Law | Boston is pleased to host the New England Regional Junior Faculty Scholarship Workshop on Friday, February 12, 2016. The workshop will bring together junior law school faculty from around the New England region to present works in progress. The workshop is timed to allow participants to incorporate feedback before the spring article submission cycle, but papers and “ideas in progress” are welcome at any stage of completion. New England Law | Boston will provide a light breakfast and lunch to attendees. There is no fee for attending the workshop, but participants will be responsible for their own travel expenses. The workshop is open to all non-tenured faculty at any law school in the United States. Each participant will be asked to present his or her own paper or project and to serve as a primary commenter on another attendee’s paper or project. To ensure an atmosphere conducive to lively discussion and constructive feedback, space is limited to twenty participants.

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Article Preview: “Reforming Civil Asset Forfeiture”

Contributing Editor: Greg Mosher
Citizens who own property in Massachusetts, or pass through Massachusetts, are at a greater risk of having their property taken and sold by the Commonwealth than in almost any other state. As if Due Process no longer applies, the Commonwealth presumes the property itself guilty, seizes it, sells it, and uses the cold hard cash to pad police and prosecutor budgets. In Reforming Civil Asset Forfeiture: Ensuring Fairness and Due Process for Property Owners in Massachusetts, Charles Basler champions civil asset forfeiture laws that are nobler than The Commonwealth’s. He explains that among the states, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is an outlier. This is not because Massachusetts is the archetype of change or on the cutting edge of social justice, but because its civil asset forfeiture law is unusually similar to federal laws of yore that were repealed some time ago.