Faculty Blog, Friedman

Executive Privilege and the Census

The truth may be out there, but President Donald Trump is doing his level best to prevent its discovery. His latest effort is the assertion of executive privilege in the face of congressional inquiries into the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census. The move is not likely to go unchallenged—and, in this… Continue reading Executive Privilege and the Census

Faculty Blog, Haynes

It’s Time to Pay Attention

For the past two years, our government has been steadily eroding the rule of law, chilling speech, riding rough shod over state’s rights, engaging in retaliatory activity against activists, and violating the constitution.  You may not have paid attention, because much of this activity has been centered in the field of immigration law.  If you… Continue reading It’s Time to Pay Attention

Faculty Blog, Friedman

Iran, Al Qaeda and the Legacy of September 11

The Trump administration may well be contemplating military action against Iran. Not only has it named Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard a foreign terrorist group – the first such designation under the aegis of a nation-state – but Secretary of State Mike Pompeo suggested in recent Senate testimony that he has “no doubt there is a… Continue reading Iran, Al Qaeda and the Legacy of September 11

Faculty Blog, Friedman, Hansen

Checking Trump, One Foreign Policy at a Time

We wrote recently, in Just Security, about December’s bipartisan Senate vote and resolution to withdraw U.S. military assistance from Yemen and to assign responsibility for the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman—legislative moves contrary to the policy wishes of the Trump administration. The Senate’s actions suggested three developments in… Continue reading Checking Trump, One Foreign Policy at a Time

Faculty Blog, Uncategorized

Faculty Blog: The President, the Courts, and National Security

By: Lawrence M. Friedman Professor Eric Posner recently explained a dilemma the federal courts face in the wake of President Trump’s election: how to check unconstitutional excesses while, at the same time, respecting the deference afforded “the president on national-security matters” in light of the president’s ability to act “on the basis of classified information,” coupled with the “need to move quickly.” That deference turns on a level of trust of the executive that courts, as exemplified by the unanimous decision of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in State of Washington v. Trump, may not hold. Posner warns of the possibility that the president, faced with many such decisions, might defy the courts. This raises the question whether the possibility of defiance, in itself, justifies adhering to the traditional deference the courts accord national security decision-making.

DACA, Executive Power, Faculty Blog, Haynes, New England Law Review, President Obama, Uncategorized

Faculty Blog: Deportation of Undocumented Persons and DACA Beneficiaries Could Crash this Country

By: Dina Francesca Haynes  President Elect Trump has indicated, in his 100–day plan, that he would, on his first day in office, invalidate all unconstitutional Executive Orders issued by President Obama. Those of us who work in the immigration and constitutional law fields understand this to mean that in January, among other actions, approximately one million young people here pursuant to Executive Action and currently in high school, college, or the military, or who have recently completed one of these, will become deportable. These are the DACA recipients, beneficiaries of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. They are in school with you or your children. They work alongside you. They pay college tuition (they are not eligible for federal financial aid, so they pay a lot of college tuition). Those who applied and were successful received work authorization and a temporary promise from the Obama Administration enabling them to remain in the United States for a short period of time, so that families would not be torn apart and so that children who entered through no fault of their own, many of whom never even knew they were undocumented until they applied to college, were not punished.