Faculty Blog, Friedman, Hansen

A Trial Date Set for September 11 Planners But No Justice in Sight

As reported in the New York Times, the judge overseeing the military tribunal of Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and the four other suspects believed to have designed and organized the September 11 attacks has set a trial date of January 2021. Although there have been numerous court hearings for these five suspects since they arrived at… Continue reading A Trial Date Set for September 11 Planners But No Justice in Sight

Faculty Blog, Friedman

Executive Privilege and the Census

The truth may be out there, but President Donald Trump is doing his level best to prevent its discovery. His latest effort is the assertion of executive privilege in the face of congressional inquiries into the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census. The move is not likely to go unchallenged—and, in this… Continue reading Executive Privilege and the Census

Faculty Blog, Haynes

It’s Time to Pay Attention

For the past two years, our government has been steadily eroding the rule of law, chilling speech, riding rough shod over state’s rights, engaging in retaliatory activity against activists, and violating the constitution.  You may not have paid attention, because much of this activity has been centered in the field of immigration law.  If you… Continue reading It’s Time to Pay Attention

Faculty Blog, Friedman

Iran, Al Qaeda and the Legacy of September 11

The Trump administration may well be contemplating military action against Iran. Not only has it named Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard a foreign terrorist group – the first such designation under the aegis of a nation-state – but Secretary of State Mike Pompeo suggested in recent Senate testimony that he has “no doubt there is a… Continue reading Iran, Al Qaeda and the Legacy of September 11

Faculty Blog, Uncategorized

Faculty Blog: The President, the Courts, and National Security

By: Lawrence M. Friedman Professor Eric Posner recently explained a dilemma the federal courts face in the wake of President Trump’s election: how to check unconstitutional excesses while, at the same time, respecting the deference afforded “the president on national-security matters” in light of the president’s ability to act “on the basis of classified information,” coupled with the “need to move quickly.” That deference turns on a level of trust of the executive that courts, as exemplified by the unanimous decision of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in State of Washington v. Trump, may not hold. Posner warns of the possibility that the president, faced with many such decisions, might defy the courts. This raises the question whether the possibility of defiance, in itself, justifies adhering to the traditional deference the courts accord national security decision-making.

Faculty Blog, Uncategorized

Faculty Blog: The Most Important Qualification for a Post in President Trump’s Cabinet

By: Lawrence M. Friedman and David M. Siegel As the confirmation process for President Trump’s cabinet comes to a close, it’s worth noting that Senators have failed to question any of the nominees about their understanding of their constitutional responsibilities under the Twenty-Fifth Amendment, much less whether any would be willing to fulfill those responsibilities.… Continue reading Faculty Blog: The Most Important Qualification for a Post in President Trump’s Cabinet